Law Professor Combats Maxim Institute Criticism of the End of Life Choice Bill

Wed, 17 Apr, 2019

Andrew Geddis, law professor at the University of Otago, has come out in support of David Seymour's changes to the End of Life Choice Bill and its progress through parliament. 

In responding to criticism that the bill will be enacted via a "flawed process," Professor Geddis points out that the changes Mr Seymour wishes to make to the Bill to limit it to terminal illness only and provide for a referendum should have been made during the Select Committee stage but were blocked by opponents on the Committee worried that a limited bill might be more likely than the original bill to pass. 

Geddis goes on to rebut many criticisms from Alex Penk, chief executive of the Maxim Institute by saying the following:

"My suspicion is that these concerns don't really reflect an underlying judgment about whether people at their end of life are able to properly consent to treatment; after all, they already do so on multiple occasions every day.

Rather it comes from a fear that people will choose something those opposed to aid in dying just don't like."

You can read more here.

Andrew Geddis, law professor at the University of Otago, has come out in support of David Seymour's changes to the End of Life Choice Bill and its progress through parliament. 

In responding to criticism that the bill will be enacted via a "flawed process," Professor Geddis points out that the changes Mr Seymour wishes to make to the Bill to limit it to terminal illness only and provide for a referendum should have been made during the Select Committee stage but were blocked by opponents on the Committee worried that a limited bill might be more likely than the original bill to pass. 

Geddis goes on to rebut many criticisms from Alex Penk, chief executive of the Maxim Institute by saying the following:

"My suspicion is that these concerns don't really reflect an underlying judgment about whether people at their end of life are able to properly consent to treatment; after all, they already do so on multiple occasions every day.

Rather it comes from a fear that people will choose something those opposed to aid in dying just don't like."

You can read more here.

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